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What is “nesting” and is it a good choice for our family?

On Behalf of | Aug 27, 2021 | Divorce, Divorce & Family Law |

Divorce is hard, but reworking your life after the ink dries on the paper is often the most challenging part. Particularly if you are navigating co-parenting with your ex-spouse, finding a way to make post-divorce life and parenting function is a major headache for many families.

One way that some families are coping with the challenges of co-parenting is by making use of a “nesting” living arrangement. Nesting involves the children living 100% of the time in a family home while the parents do the moving as per the custody schedule, according to Psychology Today.

Who does this benefit?

If done well, nesting can provide a number of benefits to children. Rather than having the children do the moving between two separate parental households, keeping them in one place removes a lot of stress. In particular, older teens may heavily resent needing to move frequently. A nesting arrangement removes this conflict. In fact, if you have older children you may find nesting until they graduate high school to be a conflict-free way of managing the situation.

Nesting can also benefit families who have children with special needs. Moving a special needs child may be dangerous, and nesting removes this necessity. Nesting can also be helpful while you and your ex-spouse take the time that you need to get used to single parenting.

Is it permanent?

If the situation suits your family, you may nest as long as you like. However, in the majority of situations nesting is semi-temporary. It is likely that you will want to set up your own independent household at some point. However, for many families, nesting is a way to protect children and reduce divorce-related conflict.

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