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Are these signs of parental alienation?

On Behalf of | Mar 30, 2021 | Divorce & Family Law |

A divorce is potentially one of the tensest experiences you will go through. Needless to say, you do not have a lot of spare time or attention. But you should still keep an eye out for potential signs of parental alienation.

This happens when a co-parent tries to drive a wedge between you and your child. Unfortunately, it can have devastating effects.

First signs of parental alienation

The Psychiatric Times look at parental alienation as it manifests for most children of divorce. Of course, this is just a general guide, as the effects of trauma differ from person to person. It changes depending on the type of tactics the alienating parent used, along with the age, maturity level and personality of the child victimized by it.

Often, you will see smaller signs emerge before the larger ones. This can include a sudden scrutiny toward everything you do.  Your child may suddenly take issue with the cleanliness of your home or how you cook their meals. They could start getting on your case for small “bad habits” that previously went unnoticed. They might be less willing to move on when you make a mistake, or let said mistakes go.

Changes in victim behavior

Their behavior may also change. Many victims will display signs of agitation or aggression. They could lash out at you, or even at other peers or authority figures. On the other hand, symptoms sometimes manifest in an inward-directed way. The victim may display signs of depression or anxiety. They could feel overwhelmed by guilt.

If you notice any of these signs during divorce, do not ignore them. They could point toward the possibility of parental alienation.

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