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May 2016 Archives

NYS Requirements for Wages to Employees

New York State requires employers to provide certain wage information to employees at the time of hire and with each payment of wages thereafter. This law, the Wage Theft Prevention Act (WTPA), took effect on April 9, 2011. Here are some key provisions of the law that employers need to know. 

I-9 Employment Eligibility Immigration Form for Employers

For immigration purposes, employers are required to verify the employment eligibility for every employee hired using the I-9 Form from the USCIS.  Employers who fail to obtain the appropriate documentation from new employees can be fined penalties in an amount of not less than $110 and not more than $1,100 for each violation per I-9 employment verification form they failed to fill out and maintain.

Three things Baby Boomers need to know about estate planning

Baby Boomers have a reputation for breaking through old stereotypes, and they're at it again. Not be outdone by previous generations, Baby Boomers are living longer and more actively. Boomers are taking up new hobbies (paddle boarding, anyone?) and traveling to foreign destinations (off to Europe to explore our roots!). They are grabbing retirement with both hands and making the most of every minute.

Language in schools: The challenge of immigrant youth

Immigrants choose to come to the United States for dozens of different reasons. From a job or investment opportunity to reuniting with family members, the U.S. is often seen as an attractive destination. Unfortunately, though, there can be unforeseen consequences as immigrant children proceed through the educational system.

Immigration benefits available for abused spouses under VAWA

One of the immigration benefits to the law known as the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is that spouses and children who experience abuse by their U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident spouse or parent no longer have to rely on the abuser to help them obtain lawful status in the United States.